What’s Inside a Dr.’s Medical Bag? – UC Irvine

What’s Inside a Dr.’s Medical Bag? – UC Irvine


Hi there. I’m Dr. Warren Wiechmann at the UC Irvine, School of Medicine. We’re going to talk a little bit today about some of these new technologies that are out there and changing the way that we both teach
medical students and potentially are going to practice medical care. One of the things that’s really interesting: If you think about all these kind of portable technologies that we use as physicians, it really hasn’t changed much in the past couple hundred years or so. That’s all changing though. So we’re gonna kind of go through some of these devices today. And I have, this is Dr. Alisa Wray, who also helps teach and work with these technologies here. So one of the easiest ones to think about here is this device. It’s an otoscope. This is what we use to look in a person’s ear. And what’s different about
this is that it leverages this device that goes right through the camera and shows
up on the screen. So we can actually look at and share the images that we’re taking a look at here. And this is actually available for about $80. It’s available for both physicians, students and patients, and this can be purchased to use with any sort of smartphone. The next device works very similarly, and it’s what we call a dermatoscope. So it takes a look at skin lesions up close, gives you a nice clean image of that mole. And we can kind of zoom it in and with a pretty good analysis, kind of compare this over time. And the thought is as a patient to have access to this device, which is
about a couple hundred dollars and over time tracks sort of, moles or lesions that you’re concerned with. So this is an ophthalmoscope designed to look at the back of the eye and this device is a little bit more expensive than the other ones for about $300 or $400, because of the special optics it has. But it really could allow that
what’s typically in a clinic to be attached to a smartphone. So this is actually a portable single-lead EKG device this one runs for about $100 or so and it allows you to get a single-lead EKG. And then after it finds a good waveform, you actually get a pretty nice image here of her heart rate and rhythm. So this is a digital stethoscope, and so like a traditional stethoscope it works the same way. But it has this device here that takes the audio sounds and pushes them to a smartphone. So I can listen in traditionally here, but I can also see the waveform of the breath and heart sounds show up here on my device. And so this little device here, it does full vital signs. It’s about the size of a hockey puck. It actually gives us the same degree of vital signs that we can get in an intensive care setting where an inpatient were to get blood pressure, we get heart rate, we get oxygen saturation, as well as temperature. So it’s really interesting when you look at this and all these devices that you have
within the kind of a small stand right here. You really have the same amount of almost diagnostic capabilities or accuracy that a standard clinic does all of which could fit in sort of a little bag and around the price point of $1,000. When we look at all these interesting tools that are coming out there, it really allows us to figure out
how to best incorporate them into how we teach our students to interact with
patients and to learn clinical skills. So a lot of these devices as you saw have good capabilities for education but could also fundamentally change the way that they
practice. And so our goal is to put this into the curriculum early so these students have exposure to kind of what’s currently out there and what’s gonna be
coming out there in the future.

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