Healthcare Basics: Patient Track

Healthcare Basics: Patient Track


In this Healthcare Basics video, we’re going
cover the Patient Track Manager, which lets us define how the patients and staff members
behave within your model. Everything a patient does in the model from the time they enter
to the time they leave is dictated by a Patient Track, so it’s an extremely important part
of your healthcare simulation project. To create a new Patient Track, click the Patient
Tracks button in the toolbar, and then Add a Patient Track. Alternatively, you could
go to the Toolbox, click Add new tool, and then Patient Track; if you right-click your
new track in the Toolbox, you can rename it � a good idea if you need to keep up with
multiple tracks. Your new track will open up in the Patient
Track Manager, where you will add, edit, and manage the various activities in each track.
If you have more than one track open in the manager, they will each have a tab at the
top so you can quickly swap between them while working. The toolbar just underneath has buttons
to add, delete, and position activities with the Patient Track. The toolbar also has the
Table View, which provides a high level overview of the settings for each activity. In the
middle is the Activity List, which houses all the activities that have been created
for this track. We only have time to cover the basics here,
so you might want to read the chapter called “Patient-Centered Activities” in the User
Manual for a deeper explanation of this tool. Here are the steps for populating the track:
you add an activity, edit the activity’s basic settings, choose and customize the appropriate
activity type, and change any advanced settings if needed. Let’s go through a very quick and
simple Patient Track example. Create a basic model with a PatientArrival, a Processing
Patient Location in the form of a Registration Desk, and a Patient Exit, with a Receptionist
Staff Group to handle registration. Open the Flowchart and connect these objects so that
patients arrive, go to registration, and then exit.
We will have three activities in our example, so add two more. By default, each activity
will have an ID followed by an underscore � the ID can be changed in the Quick Properties
to be any whole number you’d like. This ID is used to refer to this activity in other
activities, which we’ll get to in a bit. When you name the activity, the ID and underscore
are required before the name or label that will help you recognize the activity. Activities
can also have milestones, which mark the beginning and end of specific periods of time and are
useful for data gathering. They can also make naming activities much faster; if you select
a milestone before assigning a name to an activity, that activity will automatically
be named based on the milestone. We’ll focus on the basic settings for the
Arrival activity first, so choose “Arrival” for its milestone. The topmost option in the
Quick Properties is Activity Type. The most important part of creating a new activity
is choosing what activity type it will be. The activity type affects how the patient
will interact with the staff and resources within the health care facility. Notice how
the first activity has Patient Travels Unattended by default. We won’t need to change this activity
type, because we want our patient to travel unattended to the registration desk when they
arrive. This type has patients travel to a destination without the help of staff members,
so we’ll need to specify that destination. We’ll use the Patient Destination drop down
list to tell our patient where they need to walk during this activity. In this case, we
want our patient to go to the registration desk. You can use Choose a specific destination
to select the Registration Area, or just click the Sampler and then click the registration
desk in the model. Select “Registration” as the milestone for
our second activity. The Registration activity needs to have the Process activity type because
registration represents a process delay in the patient’s care. We’ll need a process time
to represent how long registration takes, and again there are many options to cover
a variety of scenarios. Because the registration process might take longer for some patients
than others, let’s choose a basic statistical distribution to add some real life variance
to the model. Finally, we need to specify which staff members are required for the process:
add a Staff Requirement using the green plus sign and use the Sampler to choose Any member
from Receptionists. Finally, the “Departure” activity should be
similar to Arrival, except the destination will be PatientExit Area, which represents
the patient exiting the facility. Let’s see these activities in action. If you click Reset
to reset the model and Run to run the simulation, you’ll see patients arrive, walk to registration,
complete the registration process, and then leave — just as we planned. Again, we’re
just scratching the surface of what you can do with Patient Tracks � please read our
User Manual for more detailed information. Thank you for watching. Tune in to the next
video to learn about Patient Arrivals and PCIs.

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